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Chorley Historical and Archaeological Society

CHORLEY HALLS

Acknowledgements to Chorley Borough Council
and Simon Gilbertson
The information below has been gathered by various members of the Society. We would be grateful for your email comments on any errors or omissions.
Count on list Ordnance Survey Grid Ref Hall Details
1 SD 5860 1190 Adlington Hall Adlington Hall, Adlington. Classical Mansion Mediaeval site. Family-Clayton. Fought Richard III. Another Family member killed fighting King Charles. Lodge which stood at the entrance to Adlington Hall Park can still be found near to the Parochial School, built in 1815 by public subscription
2 SD 5390 1690 Alder Hall  
3 SD 5970 1340 Allanson Hall Allanson Hall, Adlington. A6 Park Rd. 1618's. Family Allanson/Rigshaw. Situated on the north eastern bank of the Leeds Liverpool canal
4 SD 6220 1374 Anderton Hall (2) 2nd Anderton Hall, Anderton. Stoner family 1780. 1860 new house, Anderton Hall on banks of reservoir
5 SD 6230 1180 Anderton Old Hall Anderton Old Hall, Horwich.. 1287. Anderton family to 1668 (R.C. & Royalist). Oliver Anderton murdered by his wife Helen Anderton . Stone in the comer of Rivington churchyard, with Anderton Coat of Arms. Figure of Christ on the Cross
6 SD 5740 1830 Astley Hall Astley Hall, Chorley. Built in the 16th century and originally the home of the Charnock family Robert Charnock creditied with building a new hall ,and the datestone showing his initials, and those of his wife, with the date 1577. The courtyard a typical Tudor feature, even now, gives a special attraction to Astley. When the walls of the courtyard were restored in 1952, the wattle and daub of the original building was uncovered above the stone base of the wall. Cesansky described a two storey timber building with the great hall at its heart and containing around 30 rooms, a much larger kitchen than today and galleries inside the Great Hall, one for minstrels. This was the hall which Cromwell might have seen after the Battle of Preston
7 SD 5965 1829 Bagganley Hall Bagganley Hall, Chorley, Home of the Parker family park rangers ofHealey. Then the Talbot family. Rebuilt by John Parker 1633. Hall demolished prior to the building of the M61 Motorway
8 SD 4627 2033 Bank Hall Bank Hall, Bretherton. Dating back to the 13th century, with distinctive chimney pots and Jacobean style architecture, but each year sees it crumble a little more. First occupied by the Banastre family who can be traced back to the Battle of Hastings, 1066. Later passed to the Fleetwood family then to the Keeks before finally resting with the Lilfords. Enlarged and restored 1832. Bank Hall Action Group trying to save the Hall.
9 SD 5200 1430 Barmskin Hall Farm Barmskin Hall Farm. Heskin. Barmskin Green linked to Heskin Green by Town Lane. Farmhouse.
10 SD 5230 1850 Billinge Hall Farm Billinge Hall Farm. Eccleston.
11 SD 6257 2042 Blackhurst Hall Blackhurst Hall, Brinscall. The hall has long since gone,however a grotto that belonged to the hall, in the woods off Well Ln above the Goit.
12 SD 4803 1486 Blackmoor Hall Blackmoor Hall. Mawdesley. No further info.
13 SD 5590 1348 Blainscough Hall Blainscough Hall, Coppull. Residence of the Blainsco family. The hall is located on the Preston to Wigan Road some 1/2 mile south of the junction with Spendmore Lane. Coppull. Worthington D.D. Third President of Douai College was born in 1549 at Blainscough Hall, Coppull. Medieval moat.
14 SD 6144 2724 Blanket Hall Blanket Hall. Hoghton
15 SD 6080 2410 Bodkin Hall Bodkin Hall. Brindle. Demolished.
16 SD 5600 1240 Bogburn Hall Bogburn Hall, Coppull. 1665. Mediaeval. Haydock family, who were Quakers, accused of helping the Standish family. Some died in prison.
17 SD 6244 2765 Bolton Hall Bolton Hall. Hoghton.
18 SD 5241 1864 Box Hall Box Hall. Eccleston.
19 SD 5200 1720 Bradley Hall Bradley Hall, Eccleston. Mediaeval moated site extended to River Yarrow, cattle drives. Court of Leyland Hundred. Home of the Dacre family.
20 SD 5280 1660 Bradley North Hall Bradley North Hall
21 SD 5150 1761 Brick Hall Brick Hall Farmhouse, Eccleston. 16/17 century. Tudor. Belong to the Dicconson family.
22 SD 6032 2600 Brindle Lodge Brindle Lodge. No info.
23 SD 6220 2100 Brinscall Hall Brinscall Hall, Brinscall. Dated 1296. Mediaeval house given to Whalley Abbey by the Hoghton family in 1540 (R.C.) Also belonged to the Tudor and Stuart period. Reputed to have secret passages to Monks Hill. Further information : But is it the same Brinscall Hall built in 1876 by William Christopher Wood? The ruins of this building are now surrounded by woodland known as Wheelton Plantation. Henry Hoghton, died 1685 is quoted as living on an estate in Brinscall. Was it Brinscall Hall.?
24 SD 5620 2010 Buckshaw Hall Buckshaw Hall, Euxton: Was built in 1650's by the Robinson family. This two storey timber hall had its central part flanked by two protruding gables, one at each end with two brick chimneys built into northerly and southerly elevations John Walmesley married Ann Breres and lived at Buckshaw The hall stayed in private possession until around 1937 when it was purchased, with the accompanying farmland, by the R.O.F. to build a munitions factory.
25 SD 5780 1530 Burgh Hall Burgh Hall, Chorley:. 19th century house. Site of medieval manor. Burgh (medieval name) fortified camp. 1744. Chadwick family (R.C.) built the mill which was loaned to Richard Arkwright. Burned down 1740's. Mission founded at St. Gregorys Church
26 SD 5010 1860 Butterfly Hall Butterfly Hall. Croston: Cabbage Hall, Chorley. Location by the canal at Botany. Demolished.
27 SD 5913 1860 Cabbage Hall Cabbage Hall, Chorley.
28 SD 6285 1965 Calico Hall Calico Hall. Heapey:. Used as a moorland farmhouse. On the edge of Heapey Moor. Demolished
29 SD 4630 2145 Carr House Carr House, Bretherton. Datestone above front door states built 1613, but believed to have been built 1513 It was here in 1639 the astronomer Jerimiah Horrocks first observed Venus in its journey across the sun. An important feature of the house is a very rare cage newel staircase, four inner newel posts rise to the full height of the stairwell without interruption.
30 SD 5480 1660 Charnock Old Hall Charnock Old Hall, Charnock Richard:. The Charnock family who owned Astley Hall. Family records go back to 1242. Droveway between Charnock Richard and Astley Hall.
31 SD 5390 1250 Chisnell Hall Chisnell Hall, Wrightington:. 1277. Chisnell family up to the Civil War. Moated site. New Hall probably 18th century.
32   Chorley Hall Chorley Hall, Chorley. Was the seat of the Chorley family (R.C.) Jacobites. In 1716 the estate was confiscated by the Crown being sold to a member of the Crompton family at an auction in Preston Town Hall. Demolished by Townley Parkers. Bonnie Prince Charlie reputed to have stayed here.
33 SD 5650 2210 Clayton Hall Clayton Hall, Clayton-le-Woods:. The home of James Anderton, the uncle of John Woodcock who was sentenced to death Aug 7 1646 at Lancaster. Also belonged to the Clayton family then the Anderton family up to 1976 when it was destroyed by fire. (R.C. & Royalist).
34 SD 5801 1362 Coppull Hall Coppull Hall, Coppull: Is located 1/2 mile south west of Coppull Old Hall. A disaster befell the colliery on 20th May 1852 when 36 men lost their lives.
35 SD 5730 1390 Coppull Old Hall Coppull Old Hall, Coppull:. Set not far from the eastern bank of the River Yarrow on its north west side. Probable home of the Coppull family, who were local Lords.
36 SD 5910 1150 Crawshaw Hall Crawshaw Hall, Adlington:. Bottom of Common End. Belonged to the Worthington family.
37 SD 5960 1740 Crosse Hall Crosse Hall. Chorley:. Home of the Crosse family. On the boundary of Chorley and Healey. Off Crosse Hall Lane leading to Healey Nab
38 SD 4950 1791 Croston Hall Croston Hall, Croston. Mediaeval. DeLee, Ashton, and Trafford families. (R.C.)
39 SD 4906 1840 Croston Rectory Croston Rectory, Croston. Although the church has existed in Croston since the 12th century, it was not until much later that construction commenced on this Croston Rectory, being partially rebuilt in the 1750's. The most influential of Croston rectors was Streynsham Masters, who served the church from 1798 to 1864. In 1818 he formed one of the earliest savings banks in England.
40 SD 5630 2390 Cuerden Hall Cuerden Hall, Bamber Bridge:. Celtic 13 century. Belonged to the Charnock and Townley-Parker families.
41 SD 5950 2250 Denham Hall Denham Hall, Brindle. Thomas Burgess lived at Dineley on the Towneley Estate, Burnley. When Sir John Towneley was arrested in 1564, the Burgess family felt it was dangerous to stay on the estate and subsequently moved to Denham Hall, a farm which belonged to the de Hoghton s ofHoghton Tower. Many Catholics travelled to Denham, to hear Mass said at the altar by such as St. Edward, who had escaped from London and taken refuge at Denham. Current building 1800's. Secret altar now at Femeyhough, Preston. Nearby to Denham Hall was St. Helen's Well (now covered by tarmac of the M61 Motorway) where Catholics used to congregate, throwing pins into the well for good luck.
42 SD 6160 1520 Dill Hall Dill Hall. Heath Charnock:. Location Nickleton Brow.
43 SD 5870 1510 Duxbury Hall Duxbury Hall, Chorley:. Duxbury Hall was built in 1828 on the site of an earlier building. The estate is bounded by the River Yarrow on its western edge, Manchester Rd. to the north east and Wigan Rd. to the south east It was the home of the Standish family for centuries, whose history was rather turbulent to say the least. One branch was the Standishes of Duxbury Hall, and the other were the Standishes of Standish. Myles Standish was born in Duxbury Hall in ????(! Need to check) and was to become the leader of the Pilgrims move to America. Recently demolished (1950's). Mediaeval times, belonged to the Duxburys then later the Standish family. (C of E). Family pew in St. Laurence Church, Chorley. In the 1851 Census Duxbury Park was shown to be occupied by the Chorley mill owner Richard Smethurst. Although referred to as the "Park" it is probably the same building, as the 1851 census in Duxbury, the Smethurst's household of 15 could hardly have been accommodated anywhere else!
44 SD 5940 1400 Ellerbeck Hall Ellerbeck Hall, Heath Charnock. No longer standing, Ellerbeck Hall was situated due west of the Leeds and Liverpool canal. Builder John Hodson, 1807. This was the home of Viscount Cardwell in the time of Gladstone. The only remainder today, of this hall, is the lodge which stood at the entrance to Ellerbeck Park. Belonged to the Cardwell family, connections to the Cardwell Arms. Ellerbeck In the 1871 census was occupied by Richard Smethurst, son of Richard Smethurst of Duxbury Park, with a household of 18.
45 SD 5530 1840 Euxton Hall Euxton Hall, Euxton:. The hall is located to the West of the Preston to Wigan Rd at Euxton. William Anderton of Euxton married Frances, heiress to the Ince family estate. From this point the Andertons of Euxton take the name Ince Anderton. For a period of time they lived at Ince Manor nr. Wigan, but later returned to their original residence at Euxton Hall. 1301 belonged to the family deHolland. 1466 transferred to the Anderton family. (R.C. & Royalist) Charles II stayed in 1651.
46 SD 5738 1675 Gillibrand Hall Gillibrand Hall, Chorley: Is located to the west of Chorley beside the River Yarrow. Mediaeval. Was originally known as Lower Chorley Hall. Belonged to the Gillibrand family. 1628 , biggest landowners in Chorley (R.C. & Royalist) Later passed to the Fazackerley family
47 SD 5940 2010 Gorse Hall Gorse Hall, Chorley: Now demolished . Early 18th century owned by Thomas Gorse who was executed.
48 SD 6030 1500 Hall'ith Hill Hall'ith Hill, Heath Chamock: Late 16th early 17th century. Mediaeval moated site in the 13th century. Manor in 1200's. Family the Gogards (Heath Charnock was originally Charnock Gogard) Later the Asshawe family then the Ratcliffe family.
49 SD 5840 1930 Hartwood Hall Hartwood Hall. Chorley:. See also Higher Chorley Hall.
50 SD 5250 1550 Heskin Hall Heskin Hall, Heskin: Is one of the best examples of Tudor Architecture in Northern England. Construction started on this the New Hall in c1548, and the Hearth Tax records of 1666 record it as the largest property upon the manor with 15 hearths. The earliest records for the area (1212) describe Eccleston and Heskin as one "Knights Fee" held by Roger Garnet. In 1506 these lands, together with others, were sold to Edmund Dudley Minister of Henry Vll (later executed for treason). Later the lands did pass to his son John Dudley, Duke of Northumberland, in 1511. In 1556 the manor was bought by a local nobleman Richard Molyneux, where it remained until 1739, when it became part of the Mawdesley Estates, until sold to Alexander Kershaw in 1744. The last people to occupy the hall as a home were Lord and Lady Lilford in the 1960's
51 SD 5130 1560 Heskin Old Hall Heskin Old Hall. Heskin: Linked to Heskin Hall by Halfpenny Lane.
52   Higher Chorley Hall Higher Chorley Hall. Chorley. 1 mile NNW of Chorley town centre (Baines) Originally known as Hartwood Hall, then Chorley Hall and later Higher Chorley Hall (to distinguish it from Lower Chorley Hall, home of the Gillibrand family.) Demolished. Home of the Chorley family, then Towneley-Parkers and later used as a farmhouse.
53 SD 5160 1760 Hilton Hall Farm Hilton Hall Farm. Eccleston.
54 SD 6230 2650 Hoghton Towers Hoghton Towers, Hoghton:. The mansion approached by a steep straight avenue over half a mile long, has been the home of the deHoghton family since William the Conqueror. Knighted Sir Loin (i.e. sirloin of beef). Renovated and restored 17th century & 1862 & 1901.
55 SD 6110 2360 Lady Hall Lady Hall. Brindle: Near Leeds/Liverpool canal Withnell Fold. Present use: farm.
56 SD 6110 2360 Ladyhall (Ladyhough) Ladyhall (Ladyhough) Rivington: The original Ladyhall now sits underwater of the Upper Rivington Reservoir, and home of the Cunliffe family who at one time shared the lordship of the manor with the Anderton family. Cunliffe farm near The Street. Ghostly siting of lonely monk. Headless Cross. Pre-mediaeval. A later Lady Hall was built on the west bank of the Upper Rivington Reservoir by Liverpool Corp. in compensation when they flooded the valley
57 SD 5608 1113 Langtree Hall Langtree Hall, Coppull. Here stood the original mediaeval Manor House of the Langtree family to the east of the road. Part of its surrounding moat is still visible, though no evidence of the original hall. It is now the site of a day nursery.
58   Lathom House Lathom House, Lathom. Was heroically defended by the Countess of Derby during the English Civil War, and was demolished thereafter.
59 SD 5680 2120 Lisieux Hall Lisieux Hall, Whittle-le-Woods: Was previously Crook Hall, the mediaeval manor of Whittle. Belonged to the Crook family, 16th to the early 19th century. Part share of the manor of Whittle-le-Woods was granted to Gilbert de Witul in the reign of Henry I who subsequently passed it onto Richard le Butler, and through his ancestor John Butler de Rawcliffe into the hands of the Standish and Anderton families. The Anderton family transferred their portion of the manor to Mr. William Crooke. The other portion (moiety) described as Wythall in the wood, was passed from Warin Bussel onto the Lee family, and then to Sir Richard Hoghton through his marriage to Sibil. "New Croke Hall" as "Lisieux Hall" was then known was built by Richard Clayton Dr. of Divinity who had purchased estates known as New and Old Croke. The hall descended into the hands of Richard Clayton Esq, and as he was without ancestors, the hall passed into the hands of the Leicesters, of Toft, in Cheshire who married one of the sisters. "Old Croke Hall" descended through another member of the Clayton family to a Robert Clayton of Fulwood, then to Mr William Crooke. Formerly know as Crook Hall, Lisieux Hall sits at the end of a long drive in Dawson Lane, and was the home of the Crook family from the 17th century. Crook Hall, Whittle-le-Woods: Was a large house reputed to have nine hearths. Now known as Lisieux Hall. A long table from the now demolished Crook Hall, with a carved inscription "an aerlome" can be found at Selly Manor in Birmingham. Catherine Mary Middleton daughter of Sir Thomas Stanley Massey Stanley (died 1889) married in 1849 John Blundell of Crook Hall, Chorley.
60 SD 4956 1918 Littlewood Hall Littlewood Hall. Ulnes Walton. No info.
61 SD 4970 1980 Littlewood Hall Farm Littlewood Hall Farm. Croston.
62 SD 5710 1560 Lower Burgh Hall Lower Burgh Hall. Chorley: 15th Century. Home of the Crooke family.
63 SD 4970 1510 Mawdesley Hall Mawdesley Hall, Mawdesley: 17th century, timber framed. Datestones 1625 - 1655. Letter M. - Surname of the family who first built the hall there (1520) C of E. Sherrif of the County. Shield in Lancaster Castle. Kershaw family followed by the Forrester family today.
64 SD 4910 1710 Midge Hall Farm Midge Hall Farm. Croston:
65 SD 6230 2390 Ollerton Hall Ollerton Hall, Withnell: Family - William Bashalt Parke
66 SD 4820 2050 Over Hall Over Hall. Croston: Located on the B5247 Croston to Bretherton Rd.
67 SD 5398 1553 Park Hall Park Hall, Charnock Richard: 13th century DeLee family. A market was held each Friday. Fair three times a year. Later DeHoghton family. In the early 20th century the hall itself was a three gabled black and white property, which sat on the banks of its own lake. Richard deHoghton of Park Hall married Margaret, by whom in 1613 he also had a son named Richard
68 SD 5188 1732 Parr Hall Parr Hall. Eccleston. No info.
69   Peewet Hall Peewet Hall, Rivington. Alas now nothing more than a ruin. The hall originally sat overlooking the River Yarrow at the junction of two footpaths, one of which leads to Alance Bridge, over the north east end of the reservoir.
70 SD 5280 1490 Pyebrook Hall Pyebrook Hall. Heskin.
71 SD 6330 1450 Rivington Hall Rivington Hall, Rivington:. In 1202, Alexander de Pilkington owned Rivington Hall Richard Pilkington as a desecdant of Alexanders restored the church in the 1540's, whilst his son founded the Grammar School. In 1898 the Manor of Rivington was purchased by William Lever, who later became Viscount Lever of Portsunlight, for 60,000 from John Crompton. The original Rivington Hall was built around 1478 , being replaced by the present building in the 1780's
72   Rufford Old Hall Rufford Old Hall, Rufford. Seven miles north of Ormskirk, is one of the finest sixteenth century buildings in Lancashire. This magnificent mediaeval building is timber framed in Tudor style. It is memorable for its ornate hammer beam roof and screen. It stores fine collections of seventeenth century arms, armour and tapestries.
73 SD 5400 2010 Runshaw Hall Runshaw Hall, Euxton: Mediaeval. Belonged to the Farnworth family (R.C.) Used by the Benedictine Monks. Is located just south of Worden Hall, Leyland with Runshaw Moor continuing towards the River Yarrow.
74   Scarisbrick Hall Scarisbrick Hall, Scarisbrick This beautiful house is situated on the site of the ancestral home of the Scarisbrick family, that dates back to the time of King Stephen. The present building, considered to be one of the finest examples of Victorian Gothic architecture in the country, was designed by Pugin and completed in 1867. Its most notable feature is the 100 foot tower, which strongly resembles the well known clock tower of the Houses of Parliament, and is visible from many miles around.
75 SD 5770 2090 Shaw Hill Shaw Hill, Whittle-le-Woods: 17th century. Belonged to the Crosse family from Crosse Hall, Chorley. Part of the Nouve Riche. The two storey stone building was once the home of the Crook family. Shaw Hill or Shawe Hall became the possession of Thomas (Ikin) Bright Crosse on his marriage to Miss ? heiress to the estate.
76   Snipe Hall Snipe Hall. No info.
77 SD 6280 2010 Sour Milk Hall Sour Milk Hall. Heapey: Located on Heapey Moor towards Brinscall. Demolished. Was a moorland farm.
78 SD 5020 1740 Syd Brook Hall Farm Syd Brook Hall Farm. Eccleston: Located east side between Eccleston and Croston.
79 SD 6190 2750 Tewit Hall Tewit Hall. Hoghton
80 SD 6207 1522 The Street The Street, Rivington. The front elevation of The Street has a protruding gable at each end together with a similar one in the centre, the left one being of two storeys the right hand one being of three. These gables compliment the tall chimneys of the roof line The gardens of this house run down to the shoreline, and are framed by some wonderful views. Street was first occupied by a Mr. Martin, a textile trader, who employed many of the local hand loom weavers. An older Street was the home of the Street family doing as many had done before them, taking their name from the location. The last recorded male member of the family was Alexander Street who on his death in 1534 was reputed as leaving five daughters. Records from the Hundred Courts at Eccleston, tell of a case regarding the property, when Richard ? whose mother was a descendant of the Strett family, claimed the right to the estate on the grounds that Mr. Street had obtained the estate by fraud. He went on to claim that Richard Street was not only illegitimate, but that Alexander Streets handprint on the document leaving Richard Street the property, had been placed there after death.
81 SD 5852 1824 Trigg Hall Trigg Hall. Chorley. East of Water St./Commercial Rd. Home of the Trigg family then Haydocks and Lightoller. Demolished.
82 SD 5680 1868 Washington Hall Washington Hall. Chorley. Present use. Training College for Lancashire Fire Brigade.
83 SD 5816 1976 Waterloo Lodge Waterloo Lodge, Chorley. This Georgian Mansion is located opposite the Sea View Inn and was referred to as a private dwelling in the 1980's The hall was used by many organisations for meetings until the 1920's.
84 SD 5840 1600 Weld Bank Weld Bank. Chorley. Name derived from Weld family who inherited from Shireburns. Later sold to Gillibrands.
85 SD 6310 2080 White Hall White Hall. Wheelton: Demolished.
86 SD 6153 2320 Withnell Fold Hall Withnell Fold Hall, Withnell:. The home of the Parke family for many years. The Parke family operated the nearby papermill which provided employment for the villagers. After a number of years as a nursing home, the house reverted to a private dwelling around 1990.
87 SD 6214 2311 Withnell Hall Withnell Hall, Withnell: Built by Robert Park in 1840. Robert built and ran the Cotton Spinning Mill in Withnell. His son Thomas built and ran the Paper Mill at Withnell Fold in 1843-44. The Hall later became a Hospital and is now Lake View Nursing Home. The original Hall is still standing but is in a very poor state of repair.
88 SD 5392 2084 Worden Hall Worden Hall, Leyland. The home of the Worden family, who were occupying parts of Town of Clayton (now Clayton-le-Woods) as early as 1190 The earliest Court Rolls of Clayton Manor (1574) contains reference to William Werden and his son and heir Robert Werden. William Werden was included in the Preston Guild Rolls of 1459and Peter Werden, his son, were on the Preston Guild Rolls in 1622. William and his son Robert were the father and grandfather of the first Worden line in America. Sir Henry, named William (1537-1610), his son by his second marriage, as heir to the remainder of his estate. The rightful heir should have been Robert from his first marriage. Robert may have been disinherited because of his Catholic leanings.

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